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(Taken from an interview from a local station April 2041)

We were fortunate enough to have had the opportunity to interview Sam Jensen. At 84, Jensen is the last inmate of his kind left alive.  He represents the last of the former generation of inmate sentenced to life in prison without parole.  In 1987 at the age of 30, Jensen was found guilty of first degree murder, and his sentence was passed. Since then, he has remained incarcerated at the Graterford Maximum Security Prison in Pennsylvania. What follows is our exclusive uncensored interview with Jensen.

Smith: Good morning, Mr. Jensen.

Jensen: What the hell’s so good about it? Can I get a smoke? Not one of those sissyfied hydros either.

S: I’ll see what I can do. Why don’t you tell me what you’re doing time in here for, Mr. Jensen.

J: You work in the media! What the hell you think I’m in here for?

S: The court record says Murder in the First. What’s your side?

J: My side? (huffs. Guard lights his cigarette) My side? Yeah, I killed the bastard. That’s my side.

S: What happened, though?

J: The son of a bitch raped my daughter. What would you do? (takes a drag) I was a father. I did what I felt I had to do.

S: Twenty-seven times in the face and chest. Seems like overkill to most people.

J: Most people have their heads buried in their own asses. He deserved every bite from that blade.

S: How do you know he was the one responsible? He never had his day in court.

J: My daughter said he was the one, and I believed her! She wouldn’t ever make something like that up. Christ sakes, man.

S: Did you catch any flak once you were on the inside of this place?

J: Of course (lifts shirt) I got this scar from a guy that tried to jab me on the ball courts. Hurt like hell, but I survived. I survived a lot of crap for that matter.

S: Such as?

J: Stabbings, attempted sexual assault, strangulation… you name it.

S: I see. Mr. Jensen, public record shows you as the last of your kind.

J: What do you mean?

S: You’re the last inmate in for murder that hasn’t been executed, or assassinated under the new laws.

J: Oh, that. Yeah, I guess so.

S: What do you make of this assassination sentence?

J: I think it’s a bunch of shit (takes another drag). Computers making a bunch of decisions (exhales) no day in court and no trial…. That’s (explicative) up, man.

S: Then you believe that the Cell exists?

J: Yeah, no… maybe. Hell, I don’t know. Either way, I think they ought to have built more pens, not just started going around killing everybody.

S: Are you referring to Hell’s Forge?

J: That underground pen? Yeah. I mean, we went through a depression, another war… Shit! People got desperate! They should have built the Forge.

S: Do you think that you should be killed by one of these assassins for what you did?

J: I’d take that over the needle any day! At least then, I’d stand a chance of surviving if I kill him instead, right?

S: True. Do you think convicted felons under this new system commit the crime again once they’re sentenced and hunted?

J: Hell, I wouldn’t! I’d be too busy trying to outrun and outsmart them and stay alive. A smart system, if you ask me.

S: Do you regret what you did?

J: Hell, no! (scoffs) I’d do it again if the same thing happened. I only regret being stuck in here and not getting to see my kids grow up, you know?

S: I suppose so.

The rest of our exclusive interview can be seen on tonight’s evening news at six PM right here on this station.

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(Taken from conspiracy magazine, Hidden Switch April 2041)

 

A piece of unusual information has just been unearthed here at the Switch. After doing a little digging and rooting around on the government’s own assassin’s den, we managed to uncover a little-known project.  The project was partially funded by the US Government, and mostly funded by private venture capitalists. It’s name was Hell’s Forge. It was originally proposed in 2029 as an initiative aimed at solving the prison overpopulation problem.

The concept, on paper, was a simple one. Several investors would pull together their resources, and construct a 17-story underground penitentiary. From what we were able to uncover in print and media coverage, the blowback on the project came when the government couldn’t come to terms with where to put it, how to run it and all of the safety issues that would arise out of such an endeavor.

In the end, the government had to do something about its growing criminal population issue. So, they turned to the formation of the Hunter Cell — or so we believe. The trouble has been that we can find no public record of their existence. No Executive Order, no letters of incorporation… nothing. More troubling is that this prison project wasn’t really brought into the public eye back then either. Some of the local media outlets caught wind of what was going on when they started roping off the work site. Beyond that, no one really ever knew that this was even being considered as an option.

The big questions still remain: Who were the private investors involved in Project Hell’s Forge? Why weren’t we as a public told about it? Do any of these investors have knowledge of the Cell’s existence?

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